Case Study Tools
  • View the town
  • Assessment Matrix
  • Family Genogram
  • Family Ecomap
  • Community Sociogram
  • My Values
  • Notebook

Real Estate Development Plan

Brickville City Main Image

The real estate development plan has created mixed feelings among community members both because of the development proposal itself and the way in which the plan came to light in the community.

  • Three months ago, the trickle of gentrifying redevelopment threatened to become a flood when a major for-profit real estate developer announced plans for a large-scale development of the Brickville area.
  • While the developer's parents grew up in the area and were working-class members of the Brickville community, the developer is now wealthy and lives in an affluent suburb far from his parents' former neighborhood.
  • He is White, while the community is 95% African-American and Hispanic. He has few remaining contacts with current Brickville residents, but his vision for high-end residential and commercial development to create spaces for the ‘creative class’ has been greeted enthusiastically by some newcomers to Brickville—and with concern by others.
  • Using various companies that he owns, the real estate developer has been quietly purchasing available property inexpensively over the past five years. He now owns most of the property needed to execute his redevelopment plans and is confident that city officials will work with him to secure title to the remaining plots.
  • At first, there was some confusion in the community about the entity behind the property purchases. Some residents even had offers of sale from neighborhood residents who later admitted to working for the real estate developer. After local housing advocates exposed the company behind the real estate transactions through local media, the developer finally and publically presented to the neighborhood residents and the city a complete redevelopment plan.
  • The goal of the real estate developer’s plan, as articulated, is to "improve the neighborhood" in seven sectors:
    • economic development
    • education and energy
    • transportation
    • environment
    • health
    • cultural preservation
  • The plan calls for a complete overhaul of the physical structure in the community including the addition of four million square feet of new office buildings and stores, 12,000 new homes for all income levels, bicycle and walking paths, new parks, new streets and sewers, rehabilitation of some of the public schools in the area, a new power grid (i.e., system by which electrical power is distributed in an area) with wind turbines, and environmentally-friendly features such as rain gardens. The real estate developer secured an economic impact analysis that suggests that the job creation benefit from the development could be as high as 12,000 jobs, including both those in temporary construction and long-term employment in the new commercial enterprises.
  • The plan calls for razing the brick factory, remediating the site for contaminants, and building new homes on the site, as well as converting existing residential land into new housing and business developments.
  • The proposed concept is to surround several large employers with shops, homes, and other amenities of a well-functioning, "livable," and walkable neighborhood.
  • The real estate developer promises—in his promotional materials and in public statements—that redevelopment of the community will lead to "restored order and hope, increased employment of the residents, and stabilization of the area."
  • The dense, walkable community will enable older adult residents to live independently for a longer period of time than typical suburban communities while seeking to maintain the cohesion that has long characterized Brickville.
  • The goal of the plan is to improve the neighborhood in seven sectors:
    • economic development
    • education and energy
    • transportation
    • environment
    • health
    • maintain the heritage
  • The plan calls for a complete overhaul of the physical structure in the community including the addition of four million square feet of new office buildings and stores, 25,000 new permanent jobs, 12,000 new homes for all income levels, bicycle and walking paths, new parks, new streets and sewers, rehabilitation of several public schools in the area, a new power grid (i.e., system by which electrical power is distributed in an area) with wind turbines, and rain gardens.
  • The plan calls for razing the brick factory, remediating the site for contaminants, and building new homes on the site.
  • The proposed concept is to surround several large employers with shops, homes, and other amenities of a well-functioning, "livable," and walkable neighborhood.
  • Redevelopment of the community will lead to restored order and hope, increased employment of the residents, and stabilization of the area.
  • The dense, walkable community will enable older adult residents to live independently for a longer period of time than typical suburban communities.
  • Process goal: Think through and list the problems one might anticipate with increased need for client services and shelter.To be successful, this plan will require significant amounts of public funds to be invested in multiple ways, including tax increment financing (TIF) and tax credits.
  • Local officials must support the plan to obtain the needed approvals for the redevelopment and the financing.

Log in or sign up to take notes!

Sociogram

Review the community sociogram.

Critical Thinking Questions

These core questions, specific to each client, will help you better understand and assess your client. Refer back to your answers throughout your assessment.

View Your Questions >>